F2P Kingdom: The Cute and Cubist Worlds of Trove

This article series continues to surprise me. While many of the games I’ve approached for the column fall pretty neatly in line with my expectations, Trove free to play kind of came out of left field for me. Not so much in its business model; that went pretty much how I expected it to and I’ll get to that soon, but Trove itself is a lot more entertaining than I was expecting it to be.

trove free to play

The Game

Trove is this adorable mesh of Minecraft cubist graphics, Diablo 3’s Bounties, and an almost Landmark-esque element where you roam different biomes to find random adventures. Honestly, it feels pretty close to the kind of experience I was hoping out of a game like Landmark; this big, rolling realm where you could pretty much just wander in any given cardinal direction or towards whatever looked neat on the horizon and explore.

The greater bulk of Trove involves doing pretty much that; wandering whatever world you’ve entered via the Atlas, entering dungeons and keeps that dot the landscape, wiping out the enemies within, and grabbing the loot. From a gameplay standpoint, that’s pretty much it, but for some reason the variety of the worlds and sheer sense of whimsy that permeates Trove made that appealing to me.

Granted, things start off slow in terms of world thematics at the interim, with your first couple of worlds being merely grassland, frozen land, or desert. By the time I was pressing on to the candy world and ran into a building that was shaped like a monocle-wearing, bowler-hatted penguin, I knew things were getting completely ridiculous in the best possible way.

trove free to play

The goofy character of Trove is in everything else you see in the game. From lollipops that beg you to eat them before attacking you to players using corgis, pink red pandas, or DDR dance pads as mounts, nothing about this game feels like it was intended to be taken seriously. It’s wildly creative and deliciously irreverent.

Perhaps it’s because I’m easily amused, but the gleefully giddy setting of Trove is making it easy for me to overlook some of its shortcomings on the gameplay side. Starting the game off began with this potential for some sort of narrative direction but it instead drops you in the middle of a hub world with bare little explanation of some of the game’s systems, so it can perhaps be a bit on the jarring side. Also, while the enemies are adorable as heck, they’re also astonishingly simple in terms of AI. Challenge comes as a result of being under-leveled or undergeared and so that can be easily surmounted given enough time and grinding.

But then a player comes by wearing a weird outfit and using a bouncy ball as a mount and suddenly everything is alright again.

trove free to play

To that point, I would maybe suggest that Trove is best experienced on a very casual basis. Sure, there’s a lot of levels, stats, and grind waiting for you and it’s easy to sink yourself in, but the manner I’m approaching this game is similar to the way I approach a game like Diablo 3: something that I fire up when I just want to tumble around and have a good, goofy time.

But now we get to the matter of how much said goofy time is open as a free arrival. Like usual, my experience in Trove free to play is divided into four sections: Account Limitations, Store Offerings, Store Interruption, and Store Reliance. Each category then gets graded as either Minimal, Acceptable, or Unacceptable, with a rundown of why I came to each grade. Finally, I’ll provide a briefing on how I think Trove treated me as a free player.

Account Limitations: Minimal

What are Account Limitations? Anything that locks content away from you, from character or class choices to hotbars, access to dungeons or end game. These are things that flag you as one of the “freeloaders” and restricts your play.

trove free to play

From the start, I was only given one class: the Candy Barbarian, though you should be given a choice of several starting classes. After that, unlocking anything more will either involve you playing through the quests that (sort of) guide you through things long enough to get one free unlock of a starter class, or you pay up to try something different.

That seems pretty restrictive, but the fact that you can try out classes up to level 4 before committing any money means you don’t have to make a totally blind purchase. On top of that, as someone who played as and even preferred the Candy Barbarian, the different classes don’t seem to be more than a style choice. I felt plenty effective while in combat and didn’t really experience any other lockouts while playing otherwise.

Store Offerings: Acceptable

The Store Offerings section is a quick look at what the store has to offer. From the selection to the variety of items, this is your at-a-glance idea of whether the store is interesting and if prices seem to be fair.

trove free to play

As seems to be the standard for many F2P MMOs, Trove has more currencies and items for advancement than what sanity would demand. So, as one expects, there’s a lot of similar bundles of those currencies and items on offer. Regardless, there’s also a pretty nice selection of cosmetics available as well, along with the aforementioned different classes.

Perhaps the biggest complaint I have is the pricing, which kind of feels a little bit higher than I’d like for most items. Still, nothing in the store really slapped me with the sticker price. It’s just another storefront.

Store Interruption: Unacceptable

Store Interruption is based on how frequently you’re reminded of the in-game store during play. This either occurs through pop-up reminders that dominate your screen or buttons that redirect you to items offered in the store.

trove free to play

There were a lot of store reminders in many of Trove’s menu windows, on top of a shimmering icon guiding me to the store and a pop-up window upon logging in trying to stuff as many nods to the store as it could in one box.

I said it last time and I’ll say it here again – winking and nudging in the direction of the store is not going to make me want to buy your stuff. Please, just leave me alone. I’ll check the storefront when I damned well want to.

Store Reliance: Acceptable

This is an overall score of whether a game enters the “pay-to-win” realm with its offerings. Does the in-game store have an abundance of boosts? Does the leveling curve feel like you need to buy pots in order to progress? That’s what Store Reliance measures.

trove free to play

As you probably guessed with my thoughts on the game’s classes, there’s not a whole lot of need to buy them to get ahead. The same goes with boosts and currencies as well, with most progression items and other materials coming to me easily enough through regular gameplay and XP gains coming steadily.

That might not hold completely true for later character and Mastery levels, and I certainly can see some rather lengthy grinds for more than a few of the game’s dragon mounts, but the store boosts really feel more like an offer of convenience than absolute necessity. Of course, that all depends on how willing one is to grind for whatever item they want to get.

The Wrap-Up

I’m keeping Trove installed on my system purely for the experience of its goofiness, and I’m pleased to report that a great deal of that goofiness isn’t clawing for your wallet. While Trove’s overall gameplay can certainly strike one as shallow, it’s impossible for me to resist a brightly colored world of childish fun, and despite the reminders of the game’s storefront, I really feel like Trove’s multiverse is worth a look as a free player.

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F2P Kingdom: The Verdict on Star Wars: The Old Republic

Blame the trailer release for The Last Jedi, but this time around I finally worked myself up to trying out Star Wars The Old Republic free to play.

To be honest, I’d been putting off having this game in this column on account of a lot of assumptions held by myself and many other MMORPG players. The more I thought about it, however, I realized that those assumptions I had were formed by reading what others have rather explosively written than first-hand experience.

So with that in mind and The Last Jedi trailer repeating once more, I decided to return to the Old Republic to find the truth.

star wars the old republic free to play

The Game

There’s not a whole lot more about Star Wars The Old Republic I could tell anyone or that one of our own writers more eloquently expressed himself, but let’s assume that you’re new to this game.

Star Wars The Old Republic is the single-player multi-story RPG epic surrounded by a thin MMO shell. The game does an excellent job of letting you live out the storyline of your own character in the Star Wars universe while being officially divorced from the greater canon – a move that, honestly, makes the game’s later story content additions feel all the better. In essence, you’re getting to play a Star War fanfic in video game form.

The game itself is not exactly the pretties thing in the world, but it also most certainly isn’t the ugliest. An engine that does a good job of conveying emotion both in combat and in cinematics drives along SWTOR with all of the familiar beats of any of BioWare’s more entertaining RPGs. Of course, whether that’s entertaining to you or not is wholly dependent on one liking how BioWare runs its stories, but for me, they’re some of the Western market’s finest RPG gaming examples.

star wars the old republic free to play

As far as combat goes, every other themepark MMORPG has done this before and SWTOR most definitely is no different. You’ve got hotbars of abilities, a little global and off-global cooldown management, and that’s kind of about it. I would grant a nod to the Companions that tag along with you, but really they feel less like a vital part of the combat and more an extension of your own DPS. Or better yet, a constantly reusable healthpack, as I always set my companion to a Healer role and played the game.

That sounds like a complaint, but trust me, when the game had fixed roles for Companions and you had to suffer through hours of class and planetary questing to get to the role you wanted, it was misery. Nowadays you can have any of the Companions who join you on your adventure take up any role you want. But really, you’re probably silly if you don’t put them in Healer mode. Just trust me on this.

While the RPG element of Star Wars The Old Republic absolutely shines, the MMO portion just…doessn’t. It’s got dungeons and raids and PvP and things of that sort, but those aspects of the title feel about as tacked on as crafting systems in most MMOs do. If you’re wanting to Star Wars it up with other people at once, I’m not sure I’d call this the right tree to bark up at. That said, for experiencing the high sci-fantasy that only Star Wars can bring, there’s really no finer title.

star wars the old republic free to play

So full disclosure here: I’m returning to this game after having been a subscriber. This basically means, as illustrated in the image above, that I’m not a “true” free player but a “preferred” player. As you can see, upon my initial login I was greeted with the above screen detailing the things I wouldn’t have access to…which, honestly, kind of set the tone for the rest of my free play experience.

On the note of that experience, I’ll be breaking it up into four categories: Account Limitations, Store Offerings, Store Interruption, and Store Reliance. Each category will be rated as either Minimal, Acceptable, or Unacceptable, and explanations on why I reached those ratings will be provided. Finally, I’ll close out with my thoughts on how SWTOR treated me and how I believe it would treat the truly free-to-play.

Account Limitations: Uncceptable

What are Account Limitations? Anything that locks content away from you, from character or class choices to hotbars, access to dungeons or end game. These are things that flag you as one of the “freeloaders” and restricts your play.

star wars the old republic free to play

SWTOR is infamous for locking away the ability to get additional hotbars behind a paywall, so of course I had to give it this rating. Not only that, but a lot of this game just feels walled off and uncomfortable.

Despite this, the base game – which lets you play every single class story up to level 50 – is widely available. That, essentially, is eight BioWare RPGs for absolutely free. Which isn’t a bad deal if one likes Star Wars stories written by BioWare.

Store Offerings: Acceptable

The Store Offerings section is a quick look at what the store has to offer. From the selection to the variety of items, this is your at-a-glance idea of whether the store is interesting and if prices seem to be fair.

star wars the old republic free to play

Yep, SWTOR has lockboxes, and yep, those lockboxes tend to have the most desirable items in terms of cosmetics. That said, the a la carte store offerings aren’t exactly bad either. It really all depends on how badly one wants a Kylo Ren-style lightsaber crystal. Honestly, the store would make a killing if it emptied its lockboxes and sold the contents individually. Then again, they did kind of try that before to not terribly brilliant effect, in my opinion.

Otherwise, the store offerings are reasonable and reasonably priced as things go. With that said, I do have to admit that I found the store interruptions…

Store Interruption: Unacceptable

Store Interruption is based on how frequently you’re reminded of the in-game store during play. This either occurs through pop-up reminders that dominate your screen or buttons that redirect you to items offered in the store.

star wars the old republic free to play

At nearly every turn, I was assailed by reminders that things were not available to me or less available to me as a preferred player. Even at level 20, a window popped up that alerted me to the fact that my XP earnings were going to be lessened unless I subscribed.

Everything about SWTOR’s store warnings were intrusive, aggressive, and unnecessary. It was like being panhandled by zombies. I honestly can’t stress this enough; you are not going to get my money if you repeatedly beg me for it or tell me what I’m not getting at every open moment. You’re just not.

Store Reliance: Acceptable

This is an overall score of whether a game enters the “pay-to-win” realm with its offerings. Does the in-game store have an abundance of boosts? Does the leveling curve feel like you need to buy pots in order to progress? That’s what Store Reliance measures.

star wars the old republic

With all of the bad things about how SWTOR treats its free players, the “pay to win” issue is, in my opinion, not one of them. It has lockouts for group content that you can buy, but I care about as much about this game’s group content as its devs perceptually do, and while having modifiable Artifact gear would be nice as a free player, having a Healer role companion makes the gear grind not feel like that big of a deal.

That said, this is solely because I treat SWTOR as a single-player RPG series. If you are looking for group content, then your restrictions will perhaps feel heavier and so you will likely want to bear that in mind when looking at this grade.

The Wrap-Up

Sometimes, the raging of MMORPG discussion threads and comment boxes bear a grain of truth to them, and while it’s easy for people to swing at companies like EA because they’re the biggest target, in the case of Star Wars The Old Republic I have to admit that there’s a bit of a reason for that.

It’s hard for me to fully recommend this game, but I also really can’t stop anyone from wanting to download and give it a try. To that point, I’m lining these findings out not as an ultimatum to never play but as a warning about what you’re getting yourself in to. Perhaps you can see past that fog. In which case, good for you. Feel free to enjoy eight genuinely entertaining single-player Star Wars RPGs.

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F2P Kingdom: How Eternal is Erenor in ArcheAge Free to Play?

To be completely honest with you, I had pretty much no idea what to expect going into ArcheAge free to play. I’ve had bare little contact with players of the game and only the one meeting with the folks behind it at PAX East but otherwise, I really am a blank slate about this one. Still, seeing as the MMO is in the midst of its third-year celebration, I figured now would be as good a time as any to fill my head with what ArcheAge is all about.

archeage free to play

The Game

Like I said before, ArcheAge has been going on for three years now. It’s a sandbox MMO, but much like Black Desert Online, a lot of the more sandboxy features appear to be hidden behind the standard PvE themepark leveling path. Which frankly, is fine by me. The last thing I needed was to be slaughtered for the crime of logging in.

The game presents itself remarkably well, with all of the panache one would expect from the finer Asian-styled MMOs and a game running on the CryEngine. What really impressed me the most was the game’s world-building from the very start. About 2 thirds of the races had their own little vignette detailing their history up to the starting point of the game, and the stories told in those vignettes were pretty remarkable.

I was particularly taken with how ArcheAge spun the Elf race: we don’t have the ethereal stewards of nature here, but a race of people whose long memory of an old betrayal has caused them to become a war-like civilization in the hopes of slaying the betrayer of their former king. It’s pretty compelling stuff, in my opinion.

archeage free to play

Beyond the world and racial stories, however, what we have here is pretty run-of-the-mill. Combat is multi-button hotbar tab-target with a lineup of skills that can combo into each other, while questing in the early going has you heading to exclamation marks, going to the directed area, doing the things, then turning in. Pretty vanilla stuff.

One of the most interesting parts of the game is how classes work. You’re offered a starting class with the usual archetypes, but at levels 5 and 10, you get to add on additional disciplines to form your own custom class. Even better, if you decide you don’t like the combination you’ve come up with, you can head to an NPC and have it switched out for a generally meager cost, at least in the beginning.

I started off my Elf life as the warrior-like Battlerage, but tying it together with the Defensive discipline and Occultism discipline crafted a pretty neat character that let me buff up as well as lash out with some nice AoE skills. The freedom in ArcheAge’s class system is definitely top-notch.

archeage free to play

This sense of openness kind of leads me to my bigger criticism about the initial experience of ArcheAge as a new arrival. As much as I like not being fussed by potential gankers as I played, I was sort of hoping some more of the sandbox stuff would shine through. Again, I understand why it doesn’t and I support the decision, it just would have been nice if there was just a wee bit less hand-holding at the interim.

Despite this, ArcheAge is a fine enough fantasy MMO gaming experience. I didn’t find myself completely enraptured, but I also didn’t really find anything about the world terrible either. It’s completely inoffensive MMO gaming, for better or worse.

That said, it’s all about how much of that MMO gaming is available as a free arrival, which is what I’ll get into next. As always, I’ve broken up my experience in four different categories: Account Limitations, Store Interruption, Store Offerings, and Store Reliance. I then grant each category a grade of Minimal, Acceptable, and Oppressive with explanations on why I came to those ratings. Finally, I’ll offer up a summary of my thoughts on ArcheAge as a newly-minted free player.

archeage free to play

Account Limitations: Acceptable

What are Account Limitations? Anything that locks content away from you, from character or class choices to hotbars, access to dungeons or end game. These are things that flag you as one of the “freeloaders” and restricts your play.

In my experience, ArcheAge doesn’t limit you in the areas it matters most: general gameplay. The world, the story, and all of that tasty custom class creation is completely available to you without paying a dime. Further, the game does a pretty good job of handing you plenty of free consumables to help you along. You even get a free mount in what was probably the single most adorable series of quests I’d ever done.

The biggest wrinkles to free arrivals are related to Labor Points and to Housing. Labor Points are a form of currency that builds over time and lets you perform the game’s crafting-related activities. Free players earn 5 Points every 5 minutes, but only while they’re online, while Patrons get 10 Points every 5 minutes whether they’re online or not. As someone who wasn’t terribly intrigued by ArcheAge’s crafting, I wasn’t completely upset by the system, though whether that hamstrings me for later sandbox gaming isn’t immediately clear.

archeage free to play

As far as housing is concerned, that’s another feature available only to Patrons, though the Patron status can be earned through purchasing a sub or using in-game gold to buy APEX – an item that can be cashed in for Credits, which can then be used to buy Patron status, though you will need two APEX to have enough Credits to do so. Again, housing wasn’t something I was terribly invested in, but that most definitely is a personal preference matter and so I wanted to make note of it for those who find value in those features.

In short, I wasn’t really chafed by those limitations, but others might be. If you just want to play the game, though, you’re free and clear. If you’re looking to set roots or become a great crafter, you might be a bit limited here.

Store Interruption: Minimal

Store Interruption is based on how frequently you’re reminded of the in-game store during play. This either occurs through pop-up reminders that dominate your screen or buttons that redirect you to items offered in the store.

archeage free to play

There are a couple of buttons alerting you to becoming a Patron or aiming you towards the game’s store but otherwise, interruptions and redirects in Archeage were barely there. I wasn’t shoved in the store’s direction during character creation, there wasn’t a quest line that made me open up the in-game store browser; it was all tucked away yet noticeable enough if I wanted to browse.

Store Offerings: Acceptable

The Store Offerings section is a quick look at what the store has to offer. From the selection to the variety of items, this is your at-a-glance idea of whether the store is interesting and if prices seem to be fair.

Nothing really much to write home about here, either. While I would have liked to see more interesting costume pieces and mounts and a LOT fewer consumables, the ArcheAge store was reasonable enough. What’s nice is that at least a couple of store items can be bought with currency gained through regular play. Not a great many of them, but it was a nice little touch.

archeage free to play

Store Reliance: Acceptable

This is an overall score of whether a game enters the “pay-to-win” realm with its offerings. Does the in-game store have an abundance of boosts? Does the leveling curve feel like you need to buy pots in order to progress? That’s what Store Reliance measures.

Again, there are a whole lot of consumables and potions and similar boosts, but for the gaming experience I was going for, I wasn’t really pressured into using them. As a matter of fact, my XP gaining was so smooth that I didn’t even realize I had been granted some free XP potions until many hours later.

I repeat, though, that’s because I was playing ArcheAge simply to play the game. If you’re perhaps a more crafting-minded person, then the dependence on Labor Points and the long wait for those to regenerate without Patron status might chafe.

archeage free to play

The Wrap-Up

I’m pretty sure I’m not going to boot up ArcheAge again, but that’s more owing to generally being unimpressed with the gameplay rather than angered by its free-to-play model. As a free MMO, the greater bulk of Erenor is available and it’s a solid, competent romp in the process. Don’t expect miracles, but don’t expect to be crushed by store pressure either.

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F2P Kingdom: Getting to Godhood in Skyforge

Out of all of the games I’ve played for F2P Kingdom, this one is definitely one of the most conflicting ones. Skyforge as a gaming experience has flashes of brilliance, but Skyforge free to play has some traps that I’m not a fan of but then again it also has some reasonable offerings as well, while at the same time I wasn’t able to get a clear picture from the very start…look, I should probably just start from the beginning.

skyforge free to play

The Game

Skyforge is an action combat MMO set in a world of high technology and basic mysticism meshed together in a way that isn’t really fully explained. The game takes place on the planet Aelion which apparently is under consistent alien attack. The only line of defense against this ever-present threat is the Immortals, a collection of literal gods and goddesses that take up arms against the danger.

Conceptually, playing a god is pretty interesting and the angles the setting takes gives the whole “bunch of powerful people saving the world” thing feel more acceptable. While this world’s pantheon of deities don’t really seem to be capable of doing much of anything other than cut up enemies real good, that’s probably for the best in a world as besieged as Aelion. It lends a bit of rationale to the idea of being some suddenly magical being, instead of being told you’re The Chosen One even though you’re surrounded by other Chosen Ones.

This idea of being a god extends into Skyforge’s advancement system. Instead of base levels, you earn Might and Prestige through amassing Followers. Gaining Followers is achieved not just through combat, but through spending a currency called Knowledge of Monsters at a Church built for your character as well as spending Credits for Rituals in devotion to your godly self. It’s a pretty clever little twist on the character level number thing.

skyforge free to play

So, about that whole cutting up enemies real good part. The combat model in Skyforge feels like I wish DC Universe Online did. It’s combo-heavy with a limited action bar, but the animations are crisp, actions flow cleanly from one to the other, and pretty much every strike made impact. When you’ve had time in your chosen class to get all of your tricks, it feels incredibly good and is probably one of my favorite combo-driven combat models.

What sort of took me by surprise the most was the way classes in the game work. While it boasts a total of 13 classes as of this writing (with 14 coming soon with the arrival of the Revenant), you’re only free to play one of three at the interim. However, working your way through the game’s campaign map and clearing the land of threats opens new Temples, which in turn adds more classes to your roster. And while I was hoping to play a Gunner out of the box, I enjoyed my time as a Paladin quite a bit and have grown to adore being a Berserker that much more.

You can hot-swap out of classes with the push of a button much like you can in RIFT. What’s nicer still is that, with the exception of your weapon, your character’s loadout and equipment applies boosts no matter what class you roll. It’s definitely the most convenient implementation of class switching I’ve seen recently.

skyforge free to play

Where the game falls short for me is, again, its lore. There’s a world here and there’s certainly some clever steps applied to Skyforge’s systems to make you feel like a god, but the planet of Aelion really isn’t anything greater than a collection of instances or dungeons or the occasional shared world area. So we’ve got less of a world and more of a bunch of pretty dioramas to run around in.

Still, as multiplayer lobby MMOs go, Skyforge isn’t a really terrible gameplay experience. I’ll probably peek in once in a while but at the same time, I’m not sure I’ll work up the desire to because of a couple of its free to play business model implementations.

On the topic of those implementations: I’ll be breaking down Skyforge’s free to play model in four different categories: Account Limitations, Store Interruption, Store Offerings, and Store Reliance. Each category is then rated as Minimal, Acceptable, and Oppressive with explanations on why I came to those ratings. Finally, I’ll offer up a summary of what I feel Skyforge is like for the first-time free arrival.

skyforge free to play

Account Limitations: Minimal

What are Account Limitations? Anything that locks content away from you, from character or class choices to hotbars, access to dungeons or end game. These are things that flag you as one of the “freeloaders” and restricts your play.

As a free player, you’re going to be hamstrung less by the fact that you’re not buying anything and more by the game’s advancement that bars some of the more intriguing-sounding classes away until you’ve cleared a map. It’s not terribly ideal and I’d much rather it be more open, but I’m also not terribly upset by it. As a matter of fact, my time as a Paladin made me very comfortable with how combat worked enough that I was able to play a Berserker with relative ease.

Everything else is otherwise available to you in-game in terms of equipment and content, so there’s not much to gripe about here.

Store Interruption: Acceptable

Store Interruption is based on how frequently you’re reminded of the in-game store during play. This either occurs through pop-up reminders that dominate your screen or buttons that redirect you to items offered in the store.

There are some redirects sprinkled through the UI elements of Skyforge, but they’re also just out of the way enough that I didn’t feel a great deal of pressure. Perhaps the most obtrusive one was a window-eating pop-up about some special sale on a bundle that includes a Class and some other boosts, but that’s probably the most egregious bit of panhandling. There’s not a lot more to say beyond that, really. Redirects are there, but they’re subtle enough.

skyforge free to play

Store Offerings: Acceptable

The Store Offerings section is a quick look at what the store has to offer. From the selection to the variety of items, this is your at-a-glance idea of whether the store is interesting and if prices seem to be fair.

You’ve got boosts, a couple of currencies you can pick up, mounts, and a selection of costumes. Nothing terribly fancy or off-putting here. Prices were reasonable enough, though it actually took me a bit to realize what UI redirect would let me load up on store currency to purchase things.

What’s nice here, too, is that a fair selection of items from the store can be bought with game currency earned through simply playing the game. While some of the prices are on the higher end and I feel that in-game currency is better spent on advancement, it’s a nice touch.

skyforge free to play

Store Reliance: Oppressive

This is an overall score of whether a game enters the “pay-to-win” realm with its offerings. Does the in-game store have an abundance of boosts? Does the leveling curve feel like you need to buy pots in order to progress? That’s what Store Reliance measures.

Here’s where things get hairy for me. It took me a while to realize it, but from the very start I was granted Premium Account status. It was a sort of reward that was handed out at the end of completing a Region in the campaign map. I didn’t notice it for the longest time and so I was thinking that rewards were awfully generous. Only until after I went to the screen you see there that I realized why.

To that point, I can’t in good conscience say that my experience as a free player was truly free. Perhaps the instantly-granted Premium status was intended as a show of goodwill, but all I can see is a rug that’s about to be whipped out from beneath me. The Credits and Knowledge of Monsters currencies that I was earning were enhanced by Premium, and those currencies are directly integral to your character’s advancement.

I’m not so sure that you can play this game to its fullest and effectively without buying Premium. Even though I was handed the upgrade for simply playing, it struck a wrong chord with me.

skyforge free to play

The Wrap-Up

I would really like to enjoy this game more, but that one little random bit of Premium Access really put a damper on whatever enjoyment I was gleaning from Skyforge. That said, I really do enjoy the game as a gameplay experience. However, the fact that Premium access felt so vital to effective advancement has essentially tainted my impressions.

As a true free to play title, I’m unconvinced that Skyforge is as open without this boon. Of course, it’s entirely possible that I’m making more of this than it really is. To that point, if anyone reading this has been playing this game without a Premium stipend, you’re more than welcome to share your own impressions.

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