Man Sells MMORPG Character Worth $1.4 Million for Just $500 And Gets Sued

There’s some painful news out of China that will make anyone wince as a man sells an MMORPG character worth $1.4 million for just $500. This man was then taken to court by his friend who was apparently the owner of the character and had just let his friend play the character. The character is from the popular MMORPG Justice Online. After finishing playing with the character the friend was trying to sell the character back to his friend but in his exhaustion (from playing too much) accidentally made a typo that put it on the market for far less than it was worth. It was then quickly snatched up by another player.

The owner of the character took both his friend and NetEase to court. The case was settled with the mediation of a judge online. In the end, NetEase revoked the transaction and the plaintiff paid the buyer $12,789 in damages. After the settlement, the local court in Sichuan posted on social media about the case saying that it was a great example of the protection of digital assets and warning gamers not to spend too much on video games. Clearly they should have also reminded people to sleep before you make any big purchases or sales.

I really wish there was more information available about the character because I would love to see what a character worth $1.4 million looks like. Let this be an important lesson to anyone selling anything in a game, check that price three times before you put it up for sale.

 

Source: South Morning China Post

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Blizzard Wins the Overwatch Copyright Lawsuit in China

Blizzard wins the Overwatch copyright lawsuit in China, surprising everyone in the MMOGames office. China doesn’t exactly have the best history when it comes to copyright lawsuits and western game companies. This time though NetEase was also involved and they are the publishers of Overwatch in China.

Overwatch BCRF Charity Event - Pink Mercy

The lawsuit was against publisher 4399 Network who they originally sued in 2017 over their MOBA Heroes of Warfare. However, the article from Shanghai publication Shine states that the majority of NetEase and Blizzard’s compensation was for Clash of Fighters, which is quite likely the same game. In all 4 million yuan ($569,000) was awarded. 500,000 of that 4 million yuan was for Gunplay Battlefield, a game that has been offline since 2017. In fact, that is why a lesser amount was agreed upon.

Taking a step back to look at the bigger picture for a moment. Blizzard and NetEase’s win doesn’t signal a shift in copyright enforcement in China when foreign creators are involved. What this shows is how important it is to have a local publisher when operating in China. That is most likely why this lawsuit was successful when so many in the past haven’t been.

 

Source: Shine via Games Industry

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Pokemon Go Lawsuit Settlement Means Changes for the Game

In case you need a bit of a refresher Niantic has been fighting an ongoing Pokemon Go lawsuit since 2016 brought about by a group of people who lived near locations in the game and felt the game created a public nuisance. Niantic denied these claims but has agreed to settle the case.

As part of the settlement, Niantic agreed to pay legal fees and a small stipend to each participant. They also agreed to roll out some new rules and policies for how Pokestops and Gyms are set up in residential areas and parks.

Anyone living within a 40-meter radius of a location in the game will be able to fill out a form on the Pokemon Go website to request its removal. Niantic is then obligated to address 95% of removal requests within 15 days and carry out the removal within 5 days of agreeing to the request.

Pokestops and Gyms in public parks will in the future be switched off outside the park’s hours. This means no more sneaking into parks after they’ve closed, which was at one time a very big issue for the game. Players will also be reminded when starting large raids to be respectful of their real-world surroundings. This sounds to me like we’ll be seeing a new popup when you enter a level 4 or 5 raid.

 

Source: Gamasutra

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Blizzard Sues Glorious Saga for Being a WoW Ripoff

Blizzard has filed a lawsuit against Chinese game developer Sina Games for their mobile game Glorious Saga which they claim is “almost entirely copied from the Warcraft games and related products.”

“Every monster, creature, animal, and vehicle in the Infringing Game was copied from the Warcraft games,” the suit alleges. “Weapons, amulets, and other objects were taken straight from the Warcraft games, without pretense. Audio cues and sound effects from the Warcraft games were reproduced for the Infringing Game.”

Glorious Saga is available in the Google Play store, though in the USA it’s called Glorious World. In the lawsuit Blizzard alleges that many of Sina Games’ games are based on well-known franchises like Yu-Gi-Oh!, Naruto, and WoW. One of the things that the lawsuit points to is the mobile icon which looks nearly identical to the Battle of Azeroth expansion cover, which was a throwback to the original cover for the first Warcraft game.

This is of course hardly the first time Blizzard has had to defend itself against companies trying to profit off of their games. This is especially common with MMOs released in China. It’s rare to see them get a global release.

We’ll be following news on this lawsuit as it goes forward but it will most likely be done quietly behind the scenes and we won’t know the outcome until it’s over and even then we may never get any details.

Source: Polygon

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California Says Riot isn’t Cooperating with their Gender Discrimination Investigation

The State of California says Riot isn’t cooperating with their Gender Discrimination investigation and they are filing an investigation suit to compel Riot to cooperate. This is being carried out by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing who are asking Riot for employee pay information for “an ongoing investigation into alleged gender discrimination.”

A press release issued by the DFEH said that they’re looking into “alleged unequal pay, sexual harassment, sexual assault, retaliation, and gender discrimination in selection and promotion.” The investigation started in October 2018 but Riot has “refused to provide the Department with adequate information for DFEH to analyze whether women are paid less than men at the company.”

They allege that Riot has impeded the investigation by withholding basic employment data that employers are required by law to maintain. In response to this, Riot got in touch with Kotaku to give a response of their own.

“We’ve been in active conversations with the DFEH since its inquiry began. Investigations like this can arise when there have been allegations of workplace disparity and we’ve been cooperating in good faith with the DFEH to address its concerns. During this time, we’ve promptly responded to the DFEH’s requests, and have produced over 2,500 pages of documents and several thousand lines of pay data so far. We’ve also made several recent requests that the DFEH participate in a call with us to address their requests. To date, these requests have been unanswered, so we’re frankly disappointed to see the DFEH issue a press release alleging that we’ve been non-cooperative. We’re confident that we’ve made substantial progress on diversity, inclusion, and company culture, and look forward to continue demonstrating this to the DFEH.”

It’s really not looking good for Riot at the moment. As always we’ll continue to watch this ongoing story. If you need to catch up on everything that has led up to this moment I encourage you to read our breakdown of everything you need to know about the Riot Games Walkout and the news that came shortly after that about forced arbitration.

 

Source: Press Release, Kotaku

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MMO Money: A Week of Lawsuits and Nintendo Being Awesome

Lawsuits abound this week in the online gaming world with both Activision Blizzard and Epic Games the focus of new lawsuits. Meanwhile, Nintendo gives us a much-needed breath of fresh air with how they treat gamers and their employees. Bidding for Nexon is set to begin in April with the list of bidders reduced to just 5. Find all of this and more in this week’s MMO Money.

 

Nexon Shortlists Five Bidders for the Company

There has been quite a lot of interest in Nexon recently from major companies around the world including Disney, EA, Comcast, Tencent, and many others. But, Nexon has now lowered that list to just 5 bidders. Those five include Tencent and Kakao Corp. along with three private equity firms, Bain Capital, MBK Partners, and an unidentified firm. Quite significantly Netmarble isn’t included in this list. Netmarble had been putting together a consortium of Korean firms to bid together, believing that selling to an overseas company will damage the local games industry. In fact, this may be why we don’t see any Western-based interests in the shortlist. Bidding for the 98.64% share of Nexon that is expected to be worth as much as $13.3 billion is expected to begin in early April.

 

Source: Games Industry

 

Nintendo Asks Mobile Partners to Stop Players From Spending So Much

In a time when it seems like all game companies are after is your money Nintendo comes out and gives you a little bit of faith in the industry once more. The company is concerned with its self-image and has asked some of its mobile game development partners to adjust the microtransactions in their games so players are less likely to overspend. A source at CyberAgent, who owns the developers of Dragalia Lost told the Wall Street Journal, “Nintendo is not interested in making a large amount of revenue from a single smartphone game. If we managed the game alone, we would have made a lot more.”

This also comes less than a week after a recruitment page for Nintendo shed some light on what it’s like working for the company. The average salary is ¥9.03 million, that’s $80,000, employees can potentially get bonuses in June and December plus a pay increase every April. The average workday at Nintendo is seven hours and forty-five minutes long. As if all of that doesn’t already sound amazing full-time employees stay at the company for an average of 13.5 years. Anyone familiar with the games industry in the West will know that developers tend not to stay in one company for very long. If you’re interested in knowing more about that check out this article from Polygon.

From a personal point of view both of these pieces of news make me more likely to look at Nintendo games and support what they’re doing. Their views and the way they treat their employees is a breath of fresh air in the games industry today.

 

Source: Wall Street Journal, Games Industry

 

 

Vivendi Sells Remaining Ubisoft Shares

Ubisoft Joins Forces With Horror Movie Studio

Its been almost a year since Vivendi announced it was going to stop trying to acquire Ubisoft and finally the remaining shares it had in the company have been sold. The remaining shares it had was about 5% of the company, €429 million.

At one point in time, Vivendi owned a 27.3% stake in the company and though its attempts to own the company completely failed they did bring in about €2 billion, a capital gain of €1.2 billion. Though they failed to achieve their original goal you can hardly call the entire thing a failure. I’d love to fail my way to €2 billion, that’s about $2.2 billion USD. Vivendi has stated that they will honor their agreement and not buy shares in Ubisoft for at least 5 years.

Vivendi had previously owned Activision Blizzard but it sold the company to an investment group led by Bobby Kotick and Brian Kelly for $8.2 billion. That deal pushed Vivendi out of the games industry for 3 years until it bought its way back in with a hostile takeover of Gameloft.

 

Source: Games Industry

 

A New Law firm is Encouraging Shareholders to Sue Activision Blizzard Over Bungie Split

Another law firm is inviting shareholders to join in a class action lawsuit against Activision Blizzard, accusing the company of misleading shareholders over the end of its partnership with Bungie. The firm’s loss submission form makes the following claims:

Activision failed to disclose that “the termination of Activision Blizzard and Bungie’s partnership… was imminent”

That this termination “would foreseeably have a significant negative impact on Activision Blizzard’s revenues.”

And as a result “Activision Blizzard’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all times.”

Activision Blizzard previously said that the split from Bungie was because Destiny 2 failed to meet financial expectations. But in a recent SEC filing, the company recognized $164 million in revenue from Destiny for 2018 as a result of the split.

This comes at a time when shareholders for Activision Blizzard aren’t too happy with the company. They’ve had to warn investors that cutting hundreds of jobs (800 in total) may damage the company. They even went so far as to say there can be “no assurance that our business will be more efficient or effective” than it was before this new strategy.

Why can’t you be more like Nintendo?

 

Source: Games Industry

 

Man Sues Epic Games Over Predatory Loot Boxes

While we’re on the topic of lawsuits we should mention that Epic Games is being sued, yet again. This time though it isn’t because they used a dance in their game, instead it’s over allegations that Epic Games has engaged in predatory schemes with loot boxes in Fortnite. They allege that Epic intentionally designed Save the World to hinder player’s progress if they didn’t spend real money. They also say that Epic has “made a fortune on in-game purchases, preying in large part on minors who are especially susceptible to such predatory tactics.” The lawsuit accuses Epic of violating California’s Consumer Legal Remedies Act, False Advertising Law, and Unfair Competition Law.

What the lawsuit doesn’t mention though is that since January Epic Games now shows the contents of loot llamas in Save the World before they’re purchased with V-Bucks. So it is possible that the lawsuit won’t go anywhere since they’ve already made changes to the areas that the lawsuit covers.

 

Source: Games Industry

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Facebook Called Child Game Spending “Friendly Fraud” in Internal Documents

Facebook is the big internet evil we all love to hate on and still log in to every day. Well here’s another reason to not like them. Facebook encouraged developers to let children spend money without parental permission, going so far as to call it “friendly fraud.”This revelation comes via some internal documents that are part of a class action lawsuit against Facebook.

The internal memos, emails, and other documents are dated from between 2010 and 2014 stretching over 135 pages. The documents show that Facebook targeted children in order to grow its game business. It also shows they denied refund requests and encouraged developers to let children spend money without parental permission. This was referred to as “friendly fraud.”

The documents then continue on to recognize the issue of kids overspending in browser games. They even came up with solutions to the problem. But, they opted to ignore them!

Farm Heroes Saga Screenshot Level

An internal study shows children “spent a whopping $3.6 million” on games between October 2010 and January 2011. One parents complained that their child, a 15-year-old, spent $6,500 in two weeks.

They also encouraged developers to offer free virtual items instead of a refund to parents who complained. An employee said that this was because “virtual good bear no cost.” Not much relief to that parent who was down $6,500. Parents then started resorting to chargebacks, where credit card companies would step in and reclaim the money. Facebook discovered that 9% of money coming in from children was being claimed back in this way. For reference, the average business experiences chargeback rates of 0.5%.

An internal survey revealed that most parents were unaware that Facebook stored their credit card information or that kids could make in-game purchases with ease. It was also noted that many of these children didn’t even realize they were spending real money.

One solution that was given was requiring the first 6 numbers on a credit card to approve purchases. They even ran tests that showed this did lower the rate of refund and chargeback requests. But, instead of using it Facebook focused on “maximizing revenue.” An internal memo even explained what “friendly fraud” is and “why you shouldn’t try to block it.”

Facebook responded to all of this with the following statement.

“We intend to release additional documents as instructed by the court. Facebook works with parents and experts to offer tools for families navigating Facebook and the web. As part of that work, we routinely examine our own practices, and in 2016 agreed to update our terms and provide dedicated resources for refund requests related to purchases made by minors on Facebook.”

Basically, once Facebook gaming had died they decided to change their policy. They had made their money and the fad had faded.

 

Source: Reveal via GamesIndustry

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Lawsuit Over Westworld Mobile Game and Fallout Shelter Similarities Ends

Legal wrangling comes around often in the video game world and this particular news piece concerns studios involved in a few favored games for the staff here at MMOGames. Also, this probably takes the cake for the shortest press release of the year which is somewhat impressive, so here it is in all its glory. Bethesda Softworks and Behaviour Interactive jointly announced today that the parties have amicably resolved the lawsuit Bethesda brought against Behaviour and others related to the Fallout Shelter and the Westworld mobile game.

Fallout Shelter

While a good resolution for both parties is to be lauded, people can be forgiven for forgetting the particulars. To refresh everyone, many years ago in the distant past of mid 2018 TMZ brought the news that Bethesda Softworks, was suing Warner Bros and Behaviour Interactive as according to the suit, Behaviour stole its designs, artwork, and code for use in the Warner Bros game for Westworld, in the same vein as Fallout Shelter.

The full suit, for posterities sake, can be viewed here on Scribd courtesy of Polygon who obtained it for reporting.

The amicable resolution is good for both parties but the terms of it are likely going to be well-held secrets by the lawyers involved. Perhaps the fact that 2018 became the year of Fortnite on every device capable of playing it overshadowed Fallout Shelter and the combined impact on Westworld pushed it into obscurity. All that we know is they will take the award for the shortest press release this year unless someone really wants to show off.

Bethesda Softworks is known for enough games for an exhaustive wiki page. Though at the moment they’re best known for Fallout 76 which has had… let’s call it a troubled life.
Behaviour Interactive is best known for Warhammer 40,000: Eternal Crusade and Dead by Daylight as well as its work on Fallout Shelter and Star Citizen for Cloud Imperium Games.

 

Source: Press Release

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2018 in Battle Royale Games

There is no denying that 2018 was the year of the Battle Royale. It has dominated just about every conversation about gaming the entire year. For a good reason too, the genre is insanely popular. But, while it has been a great year there have also been more than a few Battle Royale titles shut down. So grab yourself a drink and sit back as we take a look at 2018 in Battle Royale games.

The year had a bit of a rough start as the news came out that H1Z1 had lost 90% of its player base since July 2017. Of course, a lot of the blame for that can be placed on the success of Fortnite and PUBG, so really as far as the genre goes it wasn’t a terrible thing. As the year progressed H1Z1 would go on to have the part of the game that wasn’t a Battle Royale shut down after the game moved to a new internal studio at Daybreak.

This was also the year that Ninja and Drake broke the record on Twitch for the most-viewed stream while playing Fortnite. At its peak, it was watched by 628,000 people around the world. As of this month, Ninja is the most followed Streamer on Twitch. He has more than 12 million followers and each time he streams he averages 53,000 viewers. For those wondering, Ninja started out the year making approximately $500,000 a month from streaming and later told ESPN that he’s now making nearly 7 figures a month. Oh to be Ninja just for a month.

2018 was also the year of lawsuits in the Battle Royale genre. PUBG sued NetEase for copyright infringement with their games Knives Out and Rules of Survival. In turn just a few days later NetEase threatened to sue everyone who wasn’t PUBG because…well, we’re still not really sure what they were thinking about there actually. Basically, their argument boiled down to “you took the idea that we took and made it a little different and hurt the market in doing so.” Which is exactly as stupid as it sounds. PUBG then went and sued Fortnite for plagiarizing its UI and items. Then, because 2018 wasn’t crazy enough already three stars are now suing Fortnite over the sale of emotes of their dances. Backpack Kid, Milly 2, and Alfonso Ribeiro are all going after Fortnite in a move that is seen by many to be nothing more than an attempt at getting some of that sweet Fortnite cash.

Speaking of Fortnite cash, in March Fortnite became the largest free to play console game of all time both in revenue generated and monthly active users. The game is currently sitting at the number 4 spot in terms of monthly revenue for both console and PC games. Towards the end of the year, it looked as though Fortnite had hit its peak in revenue as revenue growth slowed significantly. Of course, when you talk about revenue slowing down you have to take into consideration that Fortnite makes $2 million a day just on iOS. The last number we had was in October stating that Fortnite on iOS made $300 million worldwide just on iOS…in 200 days. Oh to be Epic just for a day.

How are they doing this? Well, according to a study done by Newzoo, Battle Royale players are more likely to spend money on games. In fact, they’re more invested all around than other competitive gamers. They’re more likely to watch esports, spend money, and spend more than 6 hours a week in game. Does that 6 hours a week number feel a bit low to anyone else?

While Fortnite is helping Tim Sweeney live everyone’s dream of swimming in money the Battle Royale genre has suffered a few losses this year. The first Battle Royale to die was Radical Heights, the 80s themed Battle Royale game that was supposed to save Boss Key Studios. Unfortunately what was released was incomplete and, according to those who played it, not all that great. The game closed not long after it was released as the studio collapsed. The result of which made founder CliffyB, of Gears of War fame, declare he would never make another game. He isn’t the first developer to have said this though, so we’ll wait and see if he follows through.

Radical Heights

SOS, upon seeing the massive success of the Battle Royale genre decided to switch gears and transition into a Battle Royale game. It was a complete disaster as none of the fans actually wanted that. So the game was review bombed and it didn’t take long for the game to shut down. They did try to fix things by bringing back the classic game, but for many fans, it was already too late. The Culling 2 was canceled after a less than stellar reception. It was a game that no one really wanted, and even the developers admitted this. Islands of Nyne also recently announced that they can no longer continue to develop the game and it is now in maintenance mode on Steam. The game is free to play and will continue to be available for the time being. With the market being largely dominated by a couple of big games it is an undeniable fact that we will see more Battle Royale games close in 2019, we just have to wait and see which ones it will be.

Much to our surprise, only a few MMOs have jumped on the Battle Royale bandwagon. For a while, those of us at MMOGames feared that every MMO would come out with a Battle Royale mode. Thankfully, at this point only a few have. Skyforge, Mortal Online, Wild West Online, and Ashes of Creation are the most notable. Though you also have it in games like Trove.

Mortal Royale

It was quite a year for the Battle Royale genre and this was barely a look at the surface. There were a vast amount of games we didn’t mention like Rapture Rejects and we didn’t even discuss how many divorces there were because of Fortnite. But now it is time to start looking ahead to 2019. We already know that Planetside Arena is on its way, what else will 2019 bring us? Next week we’ll look at a few predictions.

If you want another look back at 2018 in Battle Royale games take a look at this list of our Battle Royale roundups. They haven’t been running all year, but they will give you a bit of an idea on how the year has gone.

What Gaming Looks Like One Year After Fortnite
August Battle Royale Weekly 1 – SOS Classic Tries to Save the Game
The Battle Royale Games of Gamescom 2018
August Battle Royale Weekly 2 – Gamescom and New Games
August Battle Royale Weekly 3 – Epic Android Security Issues for Fortnite
September Battle Royale Weekly 1 – Firestorm Info Dump
September Battle Royale Weekly 2 – Adult Arrested After Threatening Kid Over Fortnite
October Battle Royale Weekly 1 – Fortnite makes $300 Million in 200 Days
October Battle Royale Weekly 2 – PUG Makes $100 Million and Goodbye SOS
November Battle Royale Weekly 1 – PUBG on PS4
November Battle Royale Weekly 2 – 200 Million Fortnite Players and Totally Accurate Battlegrounds goes F2P
December Battle Royale Weekly – Goodbye Islands of Nyne

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MMO Money: Arena of Valor Finds Success At Last

Here we are at the second to the last Tuesday of the year, which means this is our last look at the news from the business side of the games industry. Next week we’ll have an article that looks back at the biggest stories of the year so keep an eye out for that. For now, though we have Blizzard to discuss along with the Zenimax vs Oculus lawsuit, esports, and Arena of Valor’s success on the Nintendo Switch.

HGC Western Clash

 

Blizzard Kills Heroes of the Storm Esports

There have been a lot of unpopular things going on with Blizzard recently that are leaving lifelong fans wondering what has happened to the beloved brand. Most recently Blizzard took a chainsaw to Heroes of the Storm. They put an end to the competitive esports scene saying that the Heroes Global Championship and Heroes of the Dorm won’t be returning in 2019. This very sudden change has put a lot of people out of jobs. Stars who left college to pursue esports, team managers wondering what to do next, and many others from all aspects of the esports scene.

At the same time, Blizzard says that they will continue developing the game, though the cadence of releases will change. In other words, they will be releasing content less often. Blizzard also moved some developers, though they didn’t say how many, from the Heroes of the Storm development team to other teams. While they aren’t giving up on Heroes of the Storm completely it certainly sounds like this is the beginning of the end for the game, which would be just another unpopular move on Blizzard’s part. That really breaks all of this to one final question….is Blizzard working on a Battle Royale game? Only time will tell, but based on the decisions they’ve been making recently it wouldn’t be too much of a stretch.

Source: Official Site

arena of valor switch

 

Arena of Valor Downloaded 1 Million Times on Switch

In China, Tencent has seen massive success with Honour of Kings. It’s been at the top of the mobile charts every month in terms of revenue for the entire year. However, when they released it as Arena of Valor in the West it wasn’t a massive success at all. At least that is until it was released on the Nintendo Switch. Since Arena of Valor launched on the Switch at the end of September it has been downloaded 1 million times and the United States was the biggest market. While Arena of Valor hasn’t been performing as well in the West as it has in China it hasn’t all been bad news for the game. In September the MOBA reached the $15 million milestone in player spending between the App Store and Google Play. At that time the game also experienced 49% growth month over month in comparison to August. So even almost a year after launching it was still growing in a big way.

Arena of Valor is Tencent’s first console game, but with results like this, it almost certainly won’t be the last. This is especially true as the company has to try to claw back from the really quite awful year they’ve had.

Source: Games Industry

 

Intel and ESL Announce $100m Esports Investment

Blizzard might be taking a step back from the Heroes of the Storm esports scene but in other corners of the esports world, things are looking good. Intel and ESL have announced that they will be continuing their partnership to 2021 and more than $100 million in investments in the industry will be made. The partnership between the two companies is 18 years old, making it the longest standing partnership in all of esports. The deal will help to drive growth in new regions which includes a focus on hosting and large-scale events within some Asia-Pacific countries.

“ESL and Intel have worked side by side on growing esports for nearly two decades,” said Ralf Reichert, ESL founder and co-CEO. “We built a number of cornerstones of this industry together and helped many gamers in becoming legends of the sport. The long-term extended partnership with Intel opens even more opportunities for us to take our efforts to a whole different level on a global scale.”

The Vice President and General Manager of VR, Gaming, and Esports at Intel had this to say, “This joint investment with ESL into the ecosystem means that the esports growth and innovation that we’ve led over the past two decades will continue. This partnership will advance the rapid evolution of esports, and Intel is committed to ushering in this new era with technology solutions that place the gaming community and fans first.”

If you’re wondering how the esports industry is doing, on the whole, we’ll have more on esports in the coming weeks as we take a look back at 2018 from a business point of view. So be sure to keep an eye out for that.

Source: Games Industry

 

Zenimax and Oculus Settle Their VR Lawsuit

It might feel like Zenimax and Oculus have been involved in a lawsuit over the Oculus VR system forever. It all started in 2014, which certainly feels like an eternity ago. In 2017, Zenimax was awarded $500 million by a judge, but that was later cut in half upon appeal. That then led to even more appeals, though those have now been dropped. The two companies reached a settlement outside of court through the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals mediation program. The terms of the settlement weren’t disclosed and they likely never will be.

Both sides seem to be quite pleased with the outcome, and Zenimax Chairman and CEO Robert Altman said, “We are pleased that a settlement has been reached and are fully satisfied by the outcome. While we dislike litigation, we will always vigorously defend against any infringement or misappropriation of our intellectual property by third parties.”

A representative for Facebook, who own Oculus said, “We’re pleased to put this behind us and continue building the future of VR.”

It’s nice to see this story finally put to rest.

Source: Games Industry

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